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1418013591
SURGERY FOR BREAST CANCER IS NOT ABOUT REMOVING BREASTS, ALWAYS… When 32 year old Neena, an HR consultant in an MNC, walked into my clinic, accompanied by her husband and parents, I could sense an air of hopelessness surrounding this good looking young lady. The papers that were laid in front of me carried a needle biopsy report, which confirmed the diagnosis of breast cancer. Fortunately, for her, the size of the lump was about 2cms and there were no lymph nodes that I could feel in the armpit. There was no evidence of spread to the other organs on imaging. I soon realized she had been through the discussion of surgery and she had come to me for a second opinion. I soon found out why she had decided to come for a second opinion. She had been advised a modified radical mastectomy (complete removal of the breast along with the lymph nodes in the armpit). She was a successful career woman with everything going for her till yesterday and today she was grappling with this tough predicament- losing an organ, an integral part of her feminity to cancer- it was almost cruel!.......... ....To be continued.....watch this space for more.......
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How tough is the job of an oncologist? I am often asked this question and I have probably never admitted the whole truth. An oncologist is a strange amalgam of extremes of emotions....it is a never ending balancing act.While he or she has to create that environment of positivity to enable the patient to make the right choices for his/her treatment, without being overwhelmed by the side effects of treatment, he or she also has to ride the see saw of ups and downs that are likely to happen during the course of treatment with the patient. Being cheerful in the face of adversity yet remaining detached from the outcome of treatment is learnt painstakingly over years. The troubles don't end here. The oncologist is subject to scrutiny all the time....an innocuous expression could be read by the attendant or patient as despair or hopelessness, a phone call for another seriously ill patient could be extrapolated to one's own self by the patient across the table, a slight drop in the wattage of your smile could be interpreted as doomsday......and so on.It is a tough life but it becomes worth the effort when patients defy statistics, come back to meet you, year after year, treat you like a part of their extended family contributing to crucial personal decisions..... and threaten to outlive you! For more details, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Head Breast Surgical Oncology, Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj, Delhi, India
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It is not rare for me to see patients presenting with locally advanced breast cancer or metastatic cancer. Many times, I would wonder why they came in late. Till a few years back, I would judge the educated ones more harshly and enquire in my mind what education had done for them. I stopped judging them a few years ago especially after scratching their tough exteriors a bit! Six years ago, this elderly lady, speaking in impeccable English almost stumbled into my office. She was pale and weak and her daughter informed me that she had a bleeding ulcer in her left breast. I examined her and found a 15 cm large bleeding, ulcerated mass in her left breast. Her blood tests showed she was awfully low on Hemoglobin. I quickly arranged for a biopsy and also had a PET CT done, almost certain, that her disease would have spread. Thankfully, I was proved wrong. She was given blood transfusions and chemotherapy was started. She was an epitome of courage and went through her chemotherapy, surgery and radiation with a quiet resilience. During the course of her treatment, I asked her why she had presented so late. What she said shook me!She said she had a paralysed husband to look after and she had been doing that for the past 4 years. She knew about the lump and that it was growing. It is just that her husband’s need was greater. That is when the judging stopped. We may boast of a secure social fabric but many times we see these lone wagers, fighting their own battles. Their health becomes secondary. Life is not easy for many. Bless her!She is well. Her dear husband passed away 3 years ago and she runs an NGO to promote forgotten skills among women in rural Haryana. I am truly proud to have known her!

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Max Cancer Centre. Max Super Speciality Hospital108A. I. P. Extn Patparganj, New, -110092
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28.61316 77.288369 Dr. Geeta Kadayaprath - Breast Surgical Oncologist Max Cancer Centre. Max Super Speciality Hospital108A. I. P. Extn Patparganj, New, -110092
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