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Exercise has a big role to play in changing outcomes after breast cancer. Yoga has been seen to improve outcomes. At the Breast Support Group meeting, our Champions practise Yoga with the Expert
ARE YOU PURSUING A DNB IN SURGICAL, MEDICAL OR RADIATION ONCOLOGY? Are you a surgeon or physician aspiring to be an oncologist? If yes, then this is for you! ‘Max institute of Cancer Care, Patparganj and Vaishali presents C4.... Challenging Case Capsules in Cancer.. The competition , on 18th March 2018, at the Russian centre for Science and Culture, 24, Firozshah Road, New Delhi. This is your opportunity to learn and interact with potential examiners from around the country Know what to say and how much to say in an exam Test your preparedness in the Quiz prelims and stand a chance to play in the Final Quiz- Adrenalin Rush Each of you stands to win a prize! This is as good as it gets with many surprise prizes to win throughout the day and Cash prizes for the winners’ Here is the link to the Event https://youtu.be/vIMkQCpBtBo For free on line registrations please visit https://goo.gl/forms/FAMUNtwh9eyEjfne2
Breast cancer can catch anyone by surprise. Why I say that is because the usual history is a lump felt in the breast over a few weeks to a month or two or more. Apparently innocent as it caused no pain or upset the rhythm of life. It was just there! I identify with this extremely unpleasant feeling of being caught out or cornered or ganged up against, when this innocuous lump is declared cancer, almost everyday. How could a lump which was just there till yesterday change life indelibly? The grief that accompanies the diagnosis is unfathomable in most. The denial that follows and the unfairness of the situation is quite hard hitting. I, as a Clinician, after so many years of being witness to this familiar response, still find it hard to say something sensible to console, especially if the affected is young. It is almost as if I am on their side, a part of their family, going through this heart- wrenching sequence. When I am at a loss, the best I do, is hold their hands and say everything will be alright. I want it that way and no other way, as every doctor would. And it works! I liken the situation to being in quicksand. If you struggle too much with the situation, you get pulled in, the brain gets clouded and wrong decisions are made. If you reach out to a helping hand, gently ease yourself out with coaxing and cajoling coming from your loved ones, you make it! How one handles the situation has a large part to play in what the final outcome would be. We do not choose situations in life and some situations do catch you unawares. What you can choose, is your response to the situation- accepting it, making light of it, taking it in your stride and going through treatment with the desire to heal and bounce back, is usually what winners do!!
I was brought up in a middle class Malayalee family, extremely open minded about education ( like all Malayalees) but as close minded about display of any form of affection. I used to envy my north Indian friends when their parents would hug and kiss them, completely oblivious to being watched. It came naturally to them. By just watching this momentary expression of affection, I used to be suffused by an inexplicable feeling of warmth and also experience a certain positivity percolating into the environment. This seemingly innocuous expression of many positive emotions... love, kindness, a blessing, a prayer, gratitude, healing... came to be extolled as ‘Jaadoo ki Jhappi’ in Munnabhai MBBS. While I always believed in the magic of Jaadoo ki jhappi, it is my patients whose firm belief in its power to heal, that made my belief stronger. I don’t know when, but it has come to be a usual occurrence for my patients to walk up to me and almost ‘demand’ their Jaadoo ki jhappi. The awkwardness of my childhood has given way to the concerted belief that it does good to both the giver and the recipient. And that brings me to my dear Champion, Mrs C who spends time between Australia and India. She is having her regular checks post breast cancer treatment in Australia.She was here last week and waited for a couple of hours in the Outpatients for her Jaadoo ki Jhappi.And I was only too happy to oblige. If she believed it was healing for her, it was for me too! Isn’t it true, the more you give, the more you get?
ATTITUDE IS TRULY EVERYTHING The picture one would conjure up on seeing this beautiful old lady is that of a loving ‘dadi’ or ‘nani’ full of stories, weaving magic with her deft fingers as spools of thread became exquisite pieces of crochet art.She is all of 86 years old and continues to do all her chores without any help. She does not believe in stopping. And believe me she is quite extraordinary! I have known her for the last 8 years and every meeting with her is inspiring. At the age of 78 years, when many would will themselves to die at the simple pretext of a minor illness, this lady was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. She had deep jaundice and she needed a Whipple’s procedure to get rid of the cancer. This surgery is one of the most challenging to even an experienced surgeon. She and her family were explained the pros and cons in view of her age and frail self. She was determined to see this through. The surgery went to plan but the postoperative period was stormy. She had a bloated abdomen, for which she was re-explored and found to have a twisted bit of intestine. It took her a month to recover and finally, she walked out of hospital, recovered fully.She refused any further treatment and said she felt fine. She would meet me every 3 months for a year and then she stopped coming. I had almost forgotten all about her, when she resurfaced again after almost 1 year. This time she came with an ulcerated mass in the right breast. She was 80 now. She did not want any other treatment except surgery. She had a surgery to remove the breast and the lymph nodes in the armpit. Fortunately, the disease was hormone sensitive. She said no to Radiation and accepted hormonal treatment. What does one say to this except that I was fortunate to witness this most wondrous display of an old lady’s grit and determination, willing herself to live on, in the face of not one but two cancers! She came to meet me five days ago. She is disease free. Her smile lit up her wrinkled face and her eyes sparkled as she said she had come to bless me. I, honestly had nothing to offer her. Did she even realise how inspiring she is? She wanted me to share her story with everyone and so here I am! Important lesson learnt..Attitude is truly everything!!!!
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