DRGEETAKADAYAPRATH 546efbec4ec0a40e503fb7e5 False 108 1
OK
background image not found
Found Update results for
'ones'
5
It was Breast Support Group meeting on Thursday, 18.12.14.The Champions who had been through the journey of breast cancer had come in to encourage the ones who had just started treatment. What is exceptional about this interaction is that the conviction of being able to go through treatment goes up manifold when the ones who have gone through the process and have recovered completely, counsel the new kids on the block. I believe it is the fear of the unknown and the feeling of isolation that puts you on the back foot. The interesting methods of coping with the situation related by the champions, is very encouraging. The smiles, laughters, jokes...... all give the impending process of treatment, the much desired sanity!!! For more information on breast cancer, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Delhi, India
SURGERY FOR BREAST CANCER IS NOT ABOUT REMOVING BREASTS, ALWAYS… While all this continued as the standard of care for the first 65 years of the 20th century, some smart minds in the medical field started questioning the necessity of performing such radical surgeries to get optimum results. Trials got underway to compare mastectomy versus breast conservation surgery in the 1970s. A pathologist turned surgeon, Dr Umberto Veronesi, pioneered the most convincing trial in Milan. He was able to show that breast conservation surgery (removal of the lump with a surrounding 1 cm margin of normal breast tissue) followed by radiation therapy to the rest of the breast in properly selected patients yielded the same results as a complete removal of the breast. I am quite convinced that it is the pathologist in this surgeon who urged him to go for this trial. He had probably seen while looking at the breast as a pathologist that far too much was being done to address small cancers in the breast. Finally, women with breast cancer had a choice…. For more information on breast cancer, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Breast Surgeon, Max Cancer Centre, Delhi, India
Conducted the fourth in a series of Breast and Cervical Cancer awareness workshop at Janki Devi college for women. This workshop was for the faculty. Came back with the feeling that awareness comes from taking time out for oneself, feeling, touching, being breast aware. Education is not always empowering, it can actually work against you by planting a firm sense of denial in you!
A young lady of 35 years walked into my clinic with cancer phobia. Her mother had died at the age of 45 from breast cancer. She said, ” My mom was diagnosed in Stage 4 and she never had a lump in the breast. All that was there to see was that her nipple had been pulled in.” I examined her, got an ultrasound of the breast done and she is fine. While a breast lump is the commonest symptom of breast cancer, a nipple pulled in could also be a harbinger of breast cancer. Under the nipple, is hardest to feel for a lump. However, when the nipple sinks in, it may mean that there is this sinister lump sitting beneath it and pulling it towards it. If this has happened recently, you certainly need to visit a Breast Surgeon!
It is not rare for me to see patients presenting with locally advanced breast cancer or metastatic cancer. Many times, I would wonder why they came in late. Till a few years back, I would judge the educated ones more harshly and enquire in my mind what education had done for them. I stopped judging them a few years ago especially after scratching their tough exteriors a bit! Six years ago, this elderly lady, speaking in impeccable English almost stumbled into my office. She was pale and weak and her daughter informed me that she had a bleeding ulcer in her left breast. I examined her and found a 15 cm large bleeding, ulcerated mass in her left breast. Her blood tests showed she was awfully low on Hemoglobin. I quickly arranged for a biopsy and also had a PET CT done, almost certain, that her disease would have spread. Thankfully, I was proved wrong. She was given blood transfusions and chemotherapy was started. She was an epitome of courage and went through her chemotherapy, surgery and radiation with a quiet resilience. During the course of her treatment, I asked her why she had presented so late. What she said shook me!She said she had a paralysed husband to look after and she had been doing that for the past 4 years. She knew about the lump and that it was growing. It is just that her husband’s need was greater. That is when the judging stopped. We may boast of a secure social fabric but many times we see these lone wagers, fighting their own battles. Their health becomes secondary. Life is not easy for many. Bless her!She is well. Her dear husband passed away 3 years ago and she runs an NGO to promote forgotten skills among women in rural Haryana. I am truly proud to have known her!
1
false