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Decisions about surgery depend on many factors. You and your doctor will determine the kind of surgery that’s most appropriate for you based on the stage of the cancer, the "personality" of the cancer, and what is acceptable to you in terms of your long-term peace of mind. Dr. Geeta Kadayaprath - Best Breast Cancer Consultant in Delhi
1418576630
SURGERY FOR BREAST CANCER IS NOT ABOUT REMOVING BREASTS, ALWAYS… With improvements in chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal treatment and targeted therapy, breast conservation surgery has now become the treatment of choice in select patients. While it is possible to conserve the breast in early breast cancer, it is possible to offer this treatment in patients with locally advanced breast cancer also, where chemotherapy is administered first to shrink the tumor. If the tumor shrinks towards the centre and is marked while the patient is on chemotherapy, it may be possible to conserve the breast when surgery is performed after completion of chemotherapy. The philosophy behind this paradigm shift is quite obvious- that long term outcomes in terms of disease free survival and overall survival is not different with either surgical procedures. The choice is real and scientific… For more information on breast cancer, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Breast Surgeon, Max Cancer Centre, Delhi, India
1418232968
SURGERY FOR BREAST CANCER IS NOT ABOUT REMOVING BREASTS, ALWAYS… In the 1960’s, the conviction that breast cancer was a systemic disease at inception and not a local disease, prompted trials to address one question- ‘Are we doing too much?’ Radical mastectomy was replaced by modified radical mastectomy- a procedure not as mutilating as radical mastectomy ( the chest muscles were preserved)but still one, which involved loss of an organ. Moreover, to a woman, it meant much more than the loss of an organ. It probably entailed a huge psychological blow besides casting a shadow on her feminity. She, being the woman she was, in those days, came to terms with this loss, in the best manner possible. All that mattered to her was her getting well, on her feet and ready to discharge the duties of a wife, mother, daughter and more. And there was really no choice then because the doctors treating her were also convinced that sacrificing the breast was the only chance of getting well. More tomorrow.....on Evolution of treatment
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Yesterday I visited my niece and was on the phone talking to my patients, sorting things for them. When I finished, she asked me, ‘Isn’t your profession stressful?’ I was quick to say NO. The conviction in my tone has taken many years to come. I recall my early days as an oncologist and in particular, this vivacious young lady who had a relatively advanced colorectal cancer with involvement of her ovaries. She had undergone surgery elsewhere, 4 weeks prior to coming to our unit. Her abdominal wound lay open and was pouring out fecal matter and abrasive intestinal juices, consuming her skin.I could not come to terms with the unfairness of the situation, then. Why was this young lady with the most sparkling, hopeful eyes dealing with this horror? I wanted to pull her out of this mess and diligently did my best to improve her nutrition, take care of her wound and her medication. She and I would talk a lot- her dreams, her aspirations, her twins, her loving husband, her family...we became good friends! Her surgery was planned and executed well. She was recovering well and she wanted to be home to celebrate her twins’ birthday. I assured her she would. And then that day arrived, when she walked. She walked for the first time after 8 weeks. I was thrilled and went home thinking she would be out of the ICU the next day. I was going up to the hospital the next day when I got a call that she had had a cardiac arrest. I thought I had heard wrong. I ran up to the ICU and before I reached, she was gone. Pulmonary embolism had taken her away. I was distraught and I cried, rather howled, like I had lost one of my own.An elderly physician put an arm on my shoulder and said, ’ This is certainly not the last time you will have to deal with this. Don’t get attached to the outcome of what you do. Do your best but remain detached from the outcome’. Those words have stuck and I have grown since. My focus is entirely on what I can do for the person who sits across the table and entrusts his or her life to me. I do my best to understand the problem, execute treatment, handhold them and try and do whatever I can to make the experience as seamless as possible. Cancer outcomes are never a 100%. You do lose some at the end of the day but if I have contributed to making their life easier through their suffering, I have done something worthwhile. While it is easy to be overwhelmed by these difficult situations, I need to remain detached from them so that I can do more for those who need help. I have come a long way since, but it is not as if I am not affected by what happens to my patients, anymore. It is just that I have taken better charge of the emotional me and replaced it, not entirely, with the professional me!
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I am a big fan of Angelina Jolie. So what is the big deal about it? Half of the human race is possibly her fan..her looks and her acting prowess has had the world swooning. I am her fan for a different reason. I haven’t followed her movies, her drop dead gorgeous looks or her personal life but I admire her for her courage. Some years ago, this remarkable lady announced to the world that she is having both her breasts removed. She knew that she was carrying a genetic mutation which made her susceptible to breast and ovarian cancer. Her family history was strong for both breast and ovarian cancer and once she tested positive for the mutation, she knew she carried a 60-80% risk of developing either of these cancers. She was faced with the prospect of prophylactic breast and ovarian surgeries. I can only imagine the sleepless nights, the battle within-to do or not to do, several rounds of long discussions with her doctors, family and friends, the impact on her career which relied heavily on glamour, her children... and so much more. And then she made that decision to have both her breasts removed and subsequently her ovaries. She shocked the world but at the same time catapulted herself to that realm of courage and fortitude that rarely people of her standing dare to tread. I joined her fan club and her story of courage became the benchmark for women caught in a similar situation. Why I recalled this story was when I encountered my own Angelina Jolie. This young lady of 35 had a very strong family history of breast, ovarian and colon cancer on her maternal side.Her husband was gutted when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. I advised her for a genetic consult while planning for her surgery. The genetic consultant had barely advised her gene testing and was discussing the possible implications, when she said that she had made up her mind. She very calmly told the consultant that irrespective of what the test says she was going ahead with bilateral prophylactic mastectomies and bilateral ovarian surgeries in the same sitting. She came to be and conveyed the same to me. It shook me inwardly and took me a while to gain my composure as her husband stood by her, rock solid in his support of her decision. ‘COURAGE’ as a word probably does not do justice to the tenacity with which one arrives at this supremely difficult decision. I have done these surgeries before and this one was certainly not the last. Such decisions are rationalised within the multidisciplinary board, the molecular oncologists, the psychologists, the family and most importantly, the patients!! While I see more of these Angeina Jolie clones, I will always hope and pray that these amazing ladies’ decision translates into long, meaningful and inspiring lives!

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Max Cancer Centre. Max Super Speciality Hospital108A. I. P. Extn Patparganj, New, -110092
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28.61316 77.288369 Dr. Geeta Kadayaprath - Breast Surgical Oncologist Max Cancer Centre. Max Super Speciality Hospital108A. I. P. Extn Patparganj, New, -110092
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